4 Surprising Secrets for Making the Best Corn Flakes

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Corn Flakes, the world's first ready-to-eat breakfast cereal, were invented by Dr. John Harvey Kellogg in 1906. He had been experimenting with cornmeal since 1894, when he first published his book on nutrition called The Living Temple.

 

The secret to the best Corn Flakes is in the parching.

Corn Flakes, the world's corn flakes manufacturing machine first ready-to-eat breakfast cereal, were invented by Dr. John Harvey Kellogg in 1906. He had been experimenting with cornmeal since 1894, when he first published his book on nutrition called The Living Temple.

In his book, Kellogg advocated against meat and sugar and the only cooking he allowed was boiling vegetables.

He believed that eating meat would lead to serious health problems such as cancer and heart disease, so he developed a vegetarian diet that included oatmeal and whole grains like cornmeal as well as nuts and fruits.

Kellogg believed that parching (roasting) grains before milling them would make them more nutritious by killing potentially harmful bacteria that may have been present in raw grain or flour.

His original recipe called for roasting whole grains over an open fire until they were blackened; then they were ground into flour or meal by hand cranks or later by mechanical rollers powered by steam engines or electricity.

One at a time, and only once through.

There's a lot of debate about how to make the best corn flakes, and it's no wonder why: The cereal is simple, but delicious.

The first secret to making great corn flakes is to use good cornmeal — whole grain is even better. Cornmeal gives the cereal its flavor and texture.

Next, let your cornflakes rest before adding any extras. They need time to absorb moisture and soften up before you add them to the bowl.

Then, one at a time, and only once through. This will give you evenly sized flakes that won't stick together or fall apart when you pour on the milk. And lastly, cook them slowly over low heat until they're done!

Use a natural starch.

Corn flakes are an American classic. They're a favorite breakfast cereal and are also delicious when used in more elaborate recipes like corn flake pudding and corn flake crusted chicken.

Making your own corn flakes is surprisingly easy, and it's possible to make them even better than the ones you can buy in the store. Here are four secrets for making the best corn flakes:

Use a natural starch. You can use any kind of starch for this recipe, but I find that tapioca starch works best because it doesn't have any flavor and it produces nice crisp flakes that hold together well.

Mix well after cooking. When you add the cooked cereal to the pan, stir it around with a spatula until all of the kernels are coated with syrup. This ensures that every single piece gets cooked evenly and has enough moisture so that it won't burn or dry out as it bakes.

Bake at high heat. Corn flakes need to be baked at a high temperature (400 degrees F) so that they get browned on both sides before they can absorb any moisture from the syrup in their center—otherwise they'll turn soggy and gummy!

Roll out your flakes as thin as you can. If they can't be seen through, they aren't thin enough yet.

The secret to making the best corn flakes is in the rolling pin. If you roll out your flakes as thin as you can, they won't be as dense as normal corn flakes and will have a lighter texture.

Corn Flakes are one of the most popular breakfast cereals in America. They are also one of the oldest types of cereal ever made, dating back to 1894. A man named Will Keith Kellogg was looking for an alternative to wheat bread products and discovered that by cooking cornmeal with sugar and water, he could make a crunchy food that was more appealing than raw wheat bread.

After testing out several different recipes for his new cereal, he finally found one that would work by adding salt, baking soda and vanilla extract. The final product became known as "flaked breakfast food" which was later changed to "corn flakes" after being sold commercially in 1906 by his company "The Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company".

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